Featured Photograph: Lucy’s Flying Food

How does one make food fly? Blair Academy junior Lucy Zhang figured out the secret and emulated Skyler Burt’s famous flying food photography by using a quick and easy technique that took her only 15 minutes. This type of photography, often seen in magazines and commercials, looks complicated. However, Lucy assured me it wasn’t. Although initially unsure of how it would work out, Lucy stated that “it wasn’t as hard” as she thought it would be. Below, I asked her some more in-depth questions regarding her inspiration and how she followed the tutorial.

June: Where did you get inspiration for this idea?

The inspiration photo.

Lucy: I follow this guy on Instagram called @ehgg, who does floating food, and I always wondered how he did it. Then for one of our photo projects we were supposed to follow a tutorial and I found one on PetaPixel that was similar to @ehgg’s work and I really wanted to try it.

 

J: Can you describe the process?

Her photo

L: I set two poles apart from each other and connected fishing strings to them. Then I placed my food on it. I took a photo with a black background and then edited the strings and the poles out on Photoshop to make them look like they were floating.

J: Did you face any difficulties when shooting?

L: It was definitely difficult because I could never get the food to stay on the strings and it took a really long time to get it right.

J: Do you think you’ll try it again?

L: I think I’ll try it again, but next time using wires so it can hold up heavier food and I could put more weight on the strings.

J: Do you think one of these photos will end up in your AP portfolio?

L: I think these photos might appear on my portfolio, but my concentration is portraits so I have to think of how I can fit the two together.

If you want to try this technique, a tutorial can be found here.

(Copyright 2019 June Dinias)

June Dinias

June Dinias is a junior editor that has been on the Oracle since her Freshman year